Teaching Pronunciation to YLs Session 60′

As promised, this week’s post will be about “Teaching Pronunciation to Young Learners” (6-8 years old). I will be sharing some of the material I have used in the session I carried out at the Institution I work for. The extra articles have been added to the previous post.

First of all, here is the Session agenda: 

agend

[Slide 1] I started the session the same way: Why is pronunciation so important?

slide-1

  • Timing: 10′
  • Interaction: Pairs or trios
  • Monitoring: Session holder walks around the room, listens to ideas that are being shared and make notes on the most important points.
  • Feedback: Session holder boards teachers ideas.

[Slide 2, 3 and 4] I have used the same videos as the previous session to make sure teachers understand how important pronunciation is: 

  • Timing: 15′
  • Interaction: Pairs or Trios
  • Monitoring: Session holder stands still waiting for teachers to watch the video and get their conclusions.
  • Feedback: Session holder boards teachers ideas on how important it is to teach pronunciation.

[Slide 5] Here I’ll show the Underhill’s chart and ask the teachers why I have colored these specific sounds. (The answer is because they are the most common sounds and some of them are very similar to letters we already know).

slide-5

  • Timing: 5′
  • Interaction: Pairs or trios
  • Monitoring: Session holder walks around the room, listens to ideas that are being shared and make notes on the most important points.
  • Feedback: Session holder boards teachers ideas.

[Slides 6 -11] The following slides show a pronunciation lesson I planned and used with students who are 6-7 years old. They were super excited to learn it. They felt important and when they got home, the first thing they told their moms was how nice and fun their English lesson had been.

Working with animals: Sing – Official Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OrWjjOOYxhI

Students will watch the trailer and pay attention to the animals they see. At this age, they won’t write the names of the animals, but they will know their names (at least: pig, horse, dog, elephant, mouse, monkey, etc).

Slide 6.png

To narrow it down, I chose to work with the following animals. Ask ss what animals are those. They will probably not know the porcupine (and maybe the Koala). Drill the names of the animals, especially the tricky sounds: /gəˈrɪlə/ /maʊs/ /ˈpɔːkjʊpaɪn/.

slide-7

Now, ss will be shown the words. They have to match the words to each animal. Drill again. And the teachers can also work with male and female.

slide-8

After they match, students can do a “running to the board” activity or a “whispering game” with them. 

Basically, students will be in two lines (maybe boys and girls?)

  • Running to the board: The teacher says the name of one of the animals a time, students have to run to the board and touch the animal.
  • Whispering Game: Teacher goes to the end of the line, whispers one word and students have to whisper the same word to the peer who is in front of them. When the first student gets the word, s/he runs to the board, touches the animal and says the word aloud.

slide-9

Here, to make sure students got all the names and are pronouncing them correctly, you can do a “disappearing game”. You show all of the animals first (like it is), after you hide one. All the slides you will show, one of the animals below will not be there.

slide-10

After students have worked with all of these steps, it is time to present the phonetic sounds. At this stage, I have had students who looked at the phonetic symbols and understood what they were. It was brilliant!

slide-11

Ask teachers what they think of this lesson? Do they think it will work? Would they change anything? 

  • Timing: 10′
  • Interaction: Pairs or trios
  • Monitoring: Session holder walks around the room, listens to ideas that are being shared and make notes on the most important points.
  • Feedback: Session holder boards teachers ideas.

 [Slides 12 – 19] This is a lesson for 8-9 year-olds. It is about food. 

I will use a video from Ratatouillehttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jcHt29II6UA

The first thing they have to do is watch the scene and pay attention to the food they see. And share with the whole group before looking at the following pictures.

slide-12

Ask ss: Which words they shared before are the same from the list below. Also, teach them “mushroom” (and maybe “pancakes”).

slide-13

Once you move the mouse, the words (names of food) are there for them to match. 

slide-14

After they have matched all the words, they can do a “running to the board”. Then, I just point at the pictures and students have to say the names of the food correctly. Here, teachers can choose to do a whole host of activities before working with the symbols per se.

slide-15

Now, it is time they see the phonetic symbols. They have to work with the sounds and at this level and age, they have to write the words they have been previously exposed to.

slide-16

For the same level and age, there is the alphabet lesson:

Ss work with the alphabet rap and after they have to work with the individual sounds.

slide-17

Working with the individual sounds.

slide-18

Matching the letters to the correct group. And after ask what happens to the letters “O” and “R”?

slide-19

 

Ask teachers what they think of this lesson? Do they think it will work? Would they change anything? 

  • Timing: 10′
  • Interaction: Pairs or trios
  • Monitoring: Session holder walks around the room, listens to ideas that are being shared and make notes on the most important points.
  • Feedback: Session holder boards teachers ideas.

The last 10′ of the session are hands on.

Teachers are going to think about their levels and students and create pronunciation activities for them, after share with the whole group.

Teaching Pronunciation to YLs Session 60′

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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BeYouSolutions

- 16 years of teaching experience (Seven Idiomas / Cultura Inglesa Jundiaí) - 5 years as an Academic and Pedagogic coordinator - 1 year as a Pedagogic Bilingual coordinator at a Regular school - Letras Inglês Licenciatura Plena (PUC-SP) (2007) - CELTA - St. Giles SP (2008) - ETYL (English Teaching for Younger Learners) - International House Sydney (2012) - Cambridge DELTA MOD II, III - Cambridge Train the Trainer Cambridge Course - Pós em Pegagogia - PUC RS - MBA em finanças e geração de valores - PUC RS - MBA em Gestão da Escola na Contemporaneidade

One thought on “Teaching Pronunciation to YLs Session 60′”

  1. I agree that teaching pronunciation to young learners is v important. I’m interested in your use of phonetic symbols with young learners. I know many coursebooks do this but I’ve always wondered how useful it is for the age group, really (especially since they are still learning to read at this age). How do your learners find this? Do you think it’s important they know phonetic symbols at this point?

    Hi Emily,
    Not the phonetic symbols in depth but I believe that sounds are very important at any age/level.
    The phonetic symbols would be a plus.
    The students like it, and they get them very easily. Sometimes I think we underestimate our students in the sense that we keep them from learning thing because we are afraid of the outcome.
    So far, the results have been great and very positive!

    Liked by 1 person

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