And now what? Brazil’s lack of gas – A Reading Lesson (C1 CEFR)

This lesson was planned to raise our student’s awareness and also to enrich their vocabulary. I use a TED and an article from The Guardian. And the target group is aged 16 or over.

Material:

[Slide 1]

1.Introducing the topic

  • Interaction: T-SS
  • Timing: 2′
  • Monitoring: Check whether students are on the same page.
  • Feedback: only if needed.
  • Steps: Teacher shows slide 1 and introduces the topic.

[Slide 2]

2. Lead-in

  • Interaction: T-SS / S-S / S-SS
  • Timing: 5′
  • Monitoring: Teacher walks around the room, makes notes on students’ contributions.
  • Feedback: Board relevant students’ contributions.
  • Steps: What has been happening in Brazil lately?  / How do you feel about that?

[Slides 3 – 5]

3. Setting the scene (video task)

  • Interaction: T-SS / S-S / S-SS
  • Timing: 15′
  • Monitoring: Teacher walks around the room, makes notes on students’ contributions.
  • Feedback: Board relevant students’ contributions.
  • Steps:

(3’28”-5’25”) You are to watch a part of a TED TALK on “The political chemistry of oil” by Lisa Margonelli  /   What are the cognitive dissonance examples mentioned in order to diffuse anger?

(12’20”-13’30”) How does Lisa explain the cost of the gas for the American families? What is her suggestion for that issue?

When she mentions “we need to stay away from the theatre and from the moratoriums” what does she mean?

(14’00”-14’30”) Margonelli says we need to have more mobility and reduce the amount of oil we use.

[Slide 6]

4. Reading – Brainstorming

Taken and Adapted from https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/may/25/brazil-protests-latest-temer-clears-trucks-highways-army 

  • Interaction: T-SS / S-S / S-SS
  • Timing: 10′
  • Monitoring: Teacher walks around the room, makes notes on students’ contributions.
  • Feedback: Board relevant students’ contributions.
  • Steps:

The Guardian released this on Friday the 25th. What elements do you think you are going to find in the article?

Skim through the article to check if your ideas were correct.

[Slide 7]

5. Reading – Detailed (Vocabulary work)

  • Interaction: T-SS / S-S / S-SS
  • Timing: 10′
  • Monitoring: Teacher walks around the room, makes notes on students’ contributions.
  • Feedback: Board relevant students’ contributions.
  • Steps: Students go back to the article, check these words and talk about their meanings with a pair.
  • Blockaded / blɒˈkeɪd/
  • Crippled
  • Hub
  • Scarce
  • Ignited
  • Let up
  • Reuters /ˈrɔɪtərz/
  • halt /hɔːlt
  • Plunge in
  • output

[Slide 8]

6. Vocabulary in Context / Follow-up

  • Interaction: T-SS / S-S / S-SS
  • Timing: 10′
  • Monitoring: Teacher walks around the room, makes notes on students’ contributions.
  • Feedback: Board relevant students’ contributions.
  • Steps:

Have you ever had any problems with blockaded / blɒˈkeɪd/ roads?

Have you felt the scarcity of fuel these days?

What do you think has ignited this oil crisis?

What would be some of the projects the government could plunge into in order to change this situation?

What do you think the output of this situation will be?

[Slide 9]

7. Revisited the topic

  • Interaction: T-SS
  • Timing: 2′
  • Monitoring: Check whether students are on the same page.
  • Feedback: only if needed.
  • Steps: Teacher revisits the topic and ask students to list the new vocabulary they have just acquired.

 

Published by

BeYouSolutions

- 16 years of teaching experience (Seven Idiomas / Cultura Inglesa Jundiaí) - 5 years as an Academic and Pedagogic coordinator - 1 year as a Pedagogic Bilingual coordinator at a Regular school - Letras Inglês Licenciatura Plena (PUC-SP) (2007) - CELTA - St. Giles SP (2008) - ETYL (English Teaching for Younger Learners) - International House Sydney (2012) - Cambridge DELTA MOD II, III - Cambridge Train the Trainer Cambridge Course - Pós em Pegagogia - PUC RS - MBA em finanças e geração de valores - PUC RS - MBA em Gestão da Escola na Contemporaneidade

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